Health and Wellness

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2100 Plymouth Avenue North
Minneapolis, MN 55411
612-302-3157

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February is American Heart Month
What is American Heart Month?

American Heart Month, a federally designated event, is an ideal time to remind Americans to focus on their hearts and encourage them to get their families, friends and communities involved.

The first American Heart Month, which took place in February 1964, was proclaimed by President Lyndon B. Johnson via Proclamation 3566 on December 30, 1963.

The Congress, by joint resolution on that date, has requested the President to issue annually a proclamation designating February as American Heart Month. At that time, more than half the deaths in the U.S. were caused by cardiovascular disease.

While American Heart Month is a federally designated month in the United States, it’s important to realize that cardiovascular disease knows no borders.

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, remains the leading global cause of death with more than 17.9 million deaths each year. That number is expected to rise to more than 23.6 million by 2030.

President Lyndon B. Johnson’s proclamation that first declared February as American Heart Month.

Chances are, we all know someone affected by heart disease and stroke, because about 2,300 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day, an average of 1 death every 38 seconds. But together we can change that!

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Feature Article

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What Black Americans Need to Know About Heart Disease

You may know that heart disease is the #1 killer in the United States. But did you know that the risks are even higher for Black Americans?

Fast Facts: Black Americans & Heart Disease

  • Black Americans are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke than White Americans.
  • Black women (49%) and Black men (44%) have higher rates of heart disease than White men (37%) and White women (32%).
  • Between the ages of 45 and 64, Black men have a 70% higher risk and Black women have a 50% greater risk of developing heart failure than White men and women.
  • The earlier onset of heart failure means higher rates of hospitalization, earlier disability, and higher rates of premature death (death before the age of 65) for Black Americans.
  • The annual rate of first heart attacks and first strokes is higher for Black Americans than White Americans.

OUR GOAL

To raise the standard of health in our communities by focusing on the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age.

©2011 Minneapolis Urban League. All Rights Reserved.

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